Date: 07 December 21, 03:08 AM
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 Rigging Problems



Hugo Fagan


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My 22ft Sparta is on a club mooring at Southwick.  Last week I foolishly managed to pull the jib halyard completely out of the mast and I am trying to devise some way of putting it back which doesnt involve going up the mast or the mast coming down.  However, Im more or less resigned to the fact the mast will need to come down.  Never having carried out the procedure before Im more than a little apprehensive not least about setting up the standing rigging correctly afterwards. Id appreciate any suggestions or guidance.

SteveV


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Hugo,

you'll have to at least go up the mast...

You'll need enough whipping twine or similar to drop right down inside to the bottom - this is the 'mouse'. I use a 5cm nail with the head cut off as a weight - you can tie the twine onto this and wrap some tape around it to make sure it's secure and won't snag on the way down.

Before going up the mast using a bosuns chair make sure that all the other halyards still in there and anything else running inside the mast section are wound on really tight - this helps to prevent any twists inside the mast.

Get hauled up to the sheave and introduce the nail on your twine. Gently lower the mouse down inside the mast.

You can use either a bit of old coat hanger with a hook bent in the end to get hold of the mouse line through the exit point at the mast base, or pinch a crochet hook off the wife (much better!)

With a bit of fishing inside the hole you should be able to pull out the mouse line, the other end of which can be tied onto the missing halyard and pulled back through the sheave.

You can tie the mouse line onto the halyard end or use a sailmaking needle to stitch it right through the halyard core (this is much more secure and leads to fewer snags). Once again use a bit of tape wrapped around the end to make it as streamlined as possible and so reduce the risk of fouling on the way down the mast.

It's not hard to do this and it's easier to re-thread a mast when upright than it is when it's down on the deck.

Oh and if you do choose to drop the mast, get a Loos tension guage and measure all your shroud settings before you undo anything - that way you can put it all back in the same place.

Good luck.

Steve V

Hugo Fagan


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Thanks for that Steve.  The problem is that the mast and, more particularly, the main halyard aren't very substantial whereas I am (12 1/2 stone).  Additionally, although I do have sheet winches on the side decks and a jib halyard winch on top of the cabin, I don't have one on the mast itself.  I do, however, take your point on it being easier to refit the halyard if the mast is vertical.  The ideal scanario would be to find a place somewhere along the canal where I could access the masthead but I can't think of such a place.  Perhaps the big lock at springs?

clouty


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The small lock would be just as deep.  Check out the fall.  You'd have to ask permission, have help,  be prepared and be on the north side.  Fendered.  :wink:

SteveV


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I've been mulling this over. If you are using one or other of the locks the sheave is going to be quite a way away from you and wobbling around (not to mention the possibility of the port authorities having a health and safety tantrum).

How about rigging a builders ladder up against your mast on the mooring? With a couple of stays to prevent sideways movement and with the feet firm agaunst your toe rail and lifting the upper section to lodge up against the the masthead this should be good. For security clip onto the main halyard before you climb and have someone with a good few turns round the winch.

Your mast will be able to take the sideways load and you'll be doing all the climbing work rather than the winch. I appreciate you may also need some new underpants after the exercise but I suspect it'll be easier than you think.

Steve V

Hugo Fagan


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I had considered mounting  a ladder on the foredeck but had dismissed it on the basis that I would be swaying with the roll of the boat which doesn't appeal.  If however, I site the ladder on the side deck instead it might work.

jan.thirkettle@zoom.co.uk


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Hugo,

Not a cheap option, and maybe overkill but you can rent mobile cherry pickers that you tow behind your car and can set up whereever you like and whizz up in-in the region of 1-200 per day though from folk like Travis Perkins.




Quote from: "Hugo Fagan"
My 22ft Sparta is on a club mooring at Southwick.  Last week I foolishly managed to pull the jib halyard completely out of the mast and I am trying to devise some way of putting it back which doesnt involve going up the mast or the mast coming down.  However, Im more or less resigned to the fact the mast will need to come down.  Never having carried out the procedure before Im more than a little apprehensive not least about setting up the standing rigging correctly afterwards. Id appreciate any suggestions or guidance.

Brett


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Quote from: "Hugo Fagan"
....  The problem is that the mast and, more particularly, the main halyard aren't very substantial whereas I am (12 1/2 stone).  .....?

Why not tie up alongside a larger boat, haul your mast towards their mast, shin up their mast and do the job that way?

Tony Mouland


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Hi Hugo, I had exactly the same problem when I had a 'Club 19' I managed to moor up against a friends boat who had mast steps on his mast. Then went up his mast with all the precautions of bosuns chair etc. Then used the main halyard to pull the masthead towards me and then did the trick with the thin line and a small weight. Worked a treat. good luck!

Hugo Fagan


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Many thanks for the various suggestions.  I went alongside the quay wall at Emerald Quay as soon as there was sufficient water after low tide on Saturday but even then the mast head was too high to access from the quayside.

Hugo Fagan


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The top of my mast, very conveniently, reachs to just  below the forecastle on one of the large vessels in Shoreham harbour and a crewman very kindly threaded the weighted line through the sheave back into my mast for me.  I thought that that was the difficult part!  I had imagined that I would be able to see the weighted line behind the pulley at the bottom of the mast and then hook it with a piece of wire.  Unfortunately that isn't the case.  

There appears to be a plate just above the pulley inside the mast through which the halyard would pass. This, I think,  is stopping the weighted line from dropping right to the bottom. I managed to manouvre a long piece of hooked wire through the plate and into the mast cavity but cannot for the life of me manage to find the weighted line.  I know that it shoud be there because the length of line was more than enough for the mast height - unless it snagged on something on the way down.

There is a s/s collar at the bottom of the mast just above the pulleys and removal of this may give access to the interior of the mast - I'm only guessing here - but the screws just won't budge.  It may be that they are completely seized to the mast (not surprising after 30 odd years) or they may in fact be the heads of bolts and cannot be moved without lowering the mast.

I'm completely at a loss and would appreciate any suggestions!